What's that engine noise?

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be spark knock caused by an inoperative EGR valve, over advanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to have a professional engine technician remove the valve cover and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valve train.
On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valve train. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
A technician will need to inspect the valve train components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.
The bottom line is that noises all mean something. Sometimes it’s not serious. Sometimes it is. A professional engine technician can listen to your engine, attach diagnostic equipment or dig deeper into your engine to find out what the problem is. The sooner you have a pro look at your engine the better your changes are of avoiding expensive repairs or a complete rebuild.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be spark knock caused by an inoperative EGR valve, over advanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to have a professional engine technician remove the valve cover and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valve train
On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valve train. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
A technician will need to inspect the valve train components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.
The bottom line is that noises all mean something. Sometimes it’s not serious. Sometimes it is. A professional engine technician can listen to your engine, attach diagnostic equipment or dig deeper into your engine to find out what the problem is. The sooner you have a pro look at your engine the better your changes are of avoiding expensive repairs or a complete rebuild.

Quick Contact
Tel: 231-773-6414
Fax: 231-777-7845
Email: info@nwamachine.com

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We are located at 2951 S. Mill Iron Rd. Muskegon, MI 49444